Optimal marker placement for kinematic studies of the human lower extremity
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Optimal marker placement for kinematic studies of the human lower extremity

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Published by National Library of Canada in Ottawa .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesCanadian theses = Thèses canadiennes
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination2 microfiches.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18681863M
ISBN 100315565454
OCLC/WorldCa24907583

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of markers used during data acquisition remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to establish the effects of marker placement and quantity on lower extremity kinematics calculated using a constrained-kinematic model. We hypothesized that a constrained-kinematic model would produce lower-extremity kinematics errors that correlatedCited by: 7.   The purpose of this study was to establish the effects of marker placement and quantity on kinematic fidelity when using a constrained-kinematic model. We hypothesized that a constrained-kinematic model would faithfully reproduce lower extremity kinematics regardless of the number of tracking markers removed from the thigh and by: 1. sensors Article Optimization of IMU Sensor Placement for the Measurement of Lower Limb Joint Kinematics Wesley Niswander 1, Wei Wang 2 and Kimberly Kontson 1,* 1 O ce of Science and Engineering Laboratories, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD , USA; [email protected]: Wesley Niswander, Wei Wang, Kimberly Kontson. and assumptions about the lower-limb joint centres. Fifteen markers are needed for captur- used to determine the optimal location. A few studies hav e been The marker placement can follow.

The purpose of this study was to determine whether this real-time marker-placement tool could improve the consistency of gait kinematic data collected by a group of novice examiners. extremity analysis using retroreflective skin markers that follows philosophical and computational princi-ples borrowed from lower extremity kinematic analy-sis. Its advantages are ease of use and familiarity to clinicians. The analytical rotation sequence that we routinely use can be modified if required for specific test situations. Figure 1 — Marker placement for kinematic and kinetic analysis. Inset: holes cut in the shoe to allow for placing markers directly on the calcaneus. MA) revealed that these holes resulted in only a 10% decrement in heel counter stability. Both the FOD and strike pattern conditions were randomized for each runner to minimize order effects.   Optimal marker placement for kinematic studies of the human lower extremity. In Cotton CE, ed. Proceedings of the Fifth Biennial Conference and Human Locomotion Symposium of the Canadian Society for Biomechanics. Ontario: Spodym Publishers, ; 7 Ronsky JL, Nigg BM. Error in kinematic data due to marker attachment methods.

Understanding the kinematics of human movement is of both a basis and an applied value in medicine and biology. Motion measurement can be used to evaluate functional performance of limbs under normal and abnormal conditions. Kinematic knowledge is also essential for proper diagnosis and surgical treatment of joint disease and the design of prosthetic devices to restore function. The kinematics of the lower extremity are an important area of research in human running gait analysis. Abnormal running kinematics are associated with an increased incidence of lower extremity injuries among runners [1,2].While injuries may occur due to deviations in any plane, two of the most common kinematic patterns associated with injured runners occur in the sagittal plane (greater knee. common methods for the study of human movement use markers placed on the skin [7,11]. There are some is capable of calculating kinematic data of active markers attached to the body using camera and PC. As for an optimal camera placement in the setup. Active. The purpose of this study was to establish the effects of marker placement and quantity on lower extremity kinematics calculated using a constrained-kinematic model. We hypothesized that a constrained-kinematic model would produce lower-extremity kinematics errors that correlated with the number of tracking markers removed from the thigh and shank.